IMG_6727

“I want to pick up where Theodore Ohman left off,” Foss declared during a mid-May conversation at his cafe in Mount Morris. “HIs goal was to put these in every school across America. And that’s what we’re doing. I just had a couple come in and buy a Constitution to donate to the Oregon School District. Our country needs this. New plates have been made and we want to offer these to the American public. Our constitution is important.  I’d like to see these go to the schools, attorney’s offices.

I’d like to see these go to the current occupant of the White House.

Foss sells 26” by 40” reproduction prints on parchment for $99 each at Wethepeopleprints.com. Shipping is free.

“We started doing research,” Foss said. “I started calling a lot of places to authenticate. I had never seen anything like (black ink) on glass.” Wisconsin appraiser Mark Moran worked with the Antiques Roadshow series. Foss paid for the appraisal and Moran estimated the Declaration lithographs created from Ohman’s plates at $650 each. For his Declaration lithograph, Ohman used an engraving plate from 1823 and the last negative of the original Declaration before it was permanently sealed in the National Archives in the early 1900s.

No one knows how Ohman made copies of the Constitution, but Foss  discovered more than 10,000 Constitution copies in the crates. Those were done in 1953. “We believe he got sick and passed on and was never able to distribute the Constitution,” Foss said. “Theodore Ohman had two kids who are deceased. He started his printing business in Memphis, Tennessee and move to Fort Lauderdale, Florida where he passed away. His printing plates, negatives, positives and maps went up for auction in Fort Lauderdale. A gentleman in De Kalb (Ill.) purchased all of it. And it was brought to his printing business here. He passed away, that estate sold and  this stuff got moved from one warehouse to another warehouse.

“And it got forgotten.”

HERE is a nice trailer from videographer Melissa Tassone:

Foss, 57, is owner of McKendrie Street Cafe, a sandwich and coffee shop, ironically on 500 Evergreen Dr. in Mount Morris (pop. 3,100). He also owns the Below Zero ice cream and smoothie shop in downtown Mount Morris. Below Zero is across the street from the community band shell that features Wednesday and Friday night summer concerts.

Mount Morris is a cozy borough about 35 miles southwest of Rockford and 100 miles west of Chicago straight out on Route 64 (North Avenue.) A Mount Morris welcome sign on Route 64 says, “Let Freedom Ring!” Mount Morris is the home of the Illinois Freedom Bell, located in the town square. I have spent some time in Oregon, a small town about five miles east of Mount Morris, but I had never been to Mount Morris. If you want to pull the strings of a Mount Morris resident, just call their town a suburb of Oregon.

Jerry Stauffer (L) and Ken Foss (D. Hoekstra photo)

Jerry Stauffer (L) and Ken Foss (D. Hoekstra photo)

Share →

2 Responses to We the People: Now more than ever

  1. Kevin says:

    There’s nothing that quite compares to the way the Amazing Dave Hoekstra tells a story. Great read!

  2. Ken Foss says:

    Great Job on the story

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *